Ride That Horse!

Hello again! Yesterday I posted about the no stirrups work I did in my lesson last week with my coach Belinda Trussell. When I took my stirrups back we did canter work. Then, after a break, I asked to do some trot work . I wanted to see how it felt to ride the trot with stirrups. We did some half passes from the centerline and then worked on keeping the frame up and his hind end engaged. Belinda asked for a very specific series of aids.

  1. Lower legs on to engage Biasini
  2. Half halt with my back and shoulder blades to bring him together.
  3. Feather the reins and then give. No holding of the rein aid.

That series of aids will take me awhile to master. The timing is very quick but so effective. Biasini was on the “hot tamale” train at this point in the lesson. The work we had done had energized him! So when Belinda asked me for a medium trot across the short side of the arena he broke to canter. Woo Hoo! Belinda advised me that I needed less ‘gas pedal’. There were a couple of other times that Belinda reminded me to ride that horse. Not the la di da Biasini that I had been riding in our warm up but the ‘hot’ horse that I was riding now. Here is a video. And my thanks to Belinda for videoing while also teaching.

Once again I have to say that the no stirrups work had helped me with my position especially of my legs which are such an important part of the horse and rider equation.

This past week I also read a post by fellow blogger Mary Lynne Carpenter at the Backyard Horse Blog. She wrote a truthful post about starting up her horse after the winter off work. This is not a dressage horse nor is Mary Lynne a year round rider with an indoor arena. But what she found is very similar to me riding that horse. Her blog post is titled “Ride the horse underneath you”. Click on the link to see it from her perspective.

30 Comments Add yours

  1. David says:

    Last week, the girls put in a full week of riding during their spring break. Their indoor arena is a converted barn, which measures about 3/4 of a full sized indoor arena. Trish loves the kind of training it offers, a focus on the mechanics. If you’re not sharp, you’re into a wall.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. anne leueen says:

      I seem to recall that when I was riding in the jumpers we used to turn the horse into a wall if they got strong and were not listening! 😁

      Liked by 1 person

      1. David says:

        Traditionally, that’s how you get their attention. During warm-up, Trish has said you can pretty well tell how your horse is going to ride. You have to adjust what you have planned to what the horse is thinking. It’s a little bit the human brain/horse brain thing, convincing the horse it’s all their idea. Like channeling all that strong energy into the work or “giving” them the energy to work when they’d rather be in the pasture with the other horses on a day off. Trish borrows a page from dressage, using transitions to get a horse’s attention. If you do turn towards the wall to get their attention, that’s a good chance of losing your spurs for a month in Trish’s camp. One of the juniors has currently lost her spurs for doing that. She may also lose the spurs for another month for arguing having to ride dressage transitions.

        Liked by 2 people

        1. anne leueen says:

          Using my phone and it seems I have replied to myself but it was meant for you. See below.

          Liked by 1 person

      2. anne leueen says:

        Well Trish is right. My most serious correction is to halt and reinback a few steps. Then carry on. Belinda feels.that the tone has to be set in the warm.up. otherwise the horse will be thinking ” i just did it like that and she thought it was ok but now she wants more?” And dressage transitions are a great way to perk up a horse. Dressage work is very useful for the jumpers it makes riding the distance and being able to shorten or lengthen the strides much easier. But I know lots of young jumpers think dressage is boring and useless..

        Liked by 2 people

  2. dprastka says:

    Ride that horse! And riding the horse underneath you, so true in any discipline! If I’m not already following I will follow the backyard horse blog and turn on my notifications. That was a great blog post she wrote, I enjoyed it immensely! I so enjoy all that you share and Biasini sure is feeling good on this day of your lesson! 🐴❤️ Definitely makes things more challenging if they are a hot tamale! I like that description, silly boy!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. anne leueen says:

      The thing is that at the higher levels of dressage you want the horse to be a Hot horse. At the Grand Prix level things happen so fast in the tests and the horse really needs to be sparking on all cylinders to look good enough and to perform movements like the piaffe and passage. Biasini and I will never be doing the GP but even for the PSG and Inter 1 a hot horse is actually easier to ride. I hope that makes sense. So I am happy Biasini is Hot. I just have to learn how to adjust my riding and aids for that.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. dprastka says:

        It actually does make sense. I often wondered about their energy level, so I appreciate your insight. That’s a wonderful explanation of the type of horse you need for this discipline at higher levels. I get it, so then instead of a silly boy, he’s a good boy! 😀

        Liked by 1 person

        1. anne leueen says:

          Yes he is and he is working hard. It is not possible to push a more laid back horse around through the work. Even things like asking for a medium trot across the short side of the arena you want an electric and instant response because you only have 20 meters from one side to the other and if you take off the corners then it is even shorter. No room for dilly dallying. Thanks for taking the time to comment and let me know you get it.

          Liked by 1 person

    2. anne leueen says:

      And I’m so glad you are looking at the Backyard Horse Blog. I think you will enjoy it.

      Liked by 2 people

  3. This video helps to understand also the previous post better, very pleasing to watch the video.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      I’m glad you got something from the video. Thanks for commenting.

      Like

  4. Marsha says:

    Hi Ann, I can’t believe how many instructions you have to follow at the same time. 🙂 WOW!

    Like

    1. anne leueen says:

      It is what keeps me fit both mentally and physically. Thanks for your comment Marsha!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Marsha says:

        I can see how it would, Anne.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Tina Schell says:

    You know I don’t really know much about riding and the amount of skill it requires, except that I know it is extremely demanding and horse and rider must be in perfect sync. You and Biasini are magic together Anne, that’s about all I know, but I think that’s quite enough! Loved the video.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Thanks Tina and thank you for taking the time to watch the video.

      Like

  6. I could watch for hours, I love how Biasini responds to you, I will check out fellow pony lover & rider always great to expand the pony clan. Gold stars for you, great your legs & core survived no stirrups to ride again.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. anne leueen says:

      Surprisingly my vintage body suffered no ill effects from the no stirrups work. Do take a look at the Backyard Horse Blog. I think her post about riding the horse underneath you makes good sense for any discipline of rider.

      Liked by 3 people

  7. Camryn says:

    Biasini’s trot looks so beautiful! I just can’t get over it!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. anne leueen says:

      Thank you.i will accept that nice compliment for him on his behalf 😀

      Liked by 2 people

  8. Hello, Anne. It is an honor to have you mention and link to my own blog post “Ride the horse underneath you.” As I commented previously, even though you and I ride in different types of saddles and at different levels, we both are still working with the variable nature of the horse. I think all riders can find a wonderful area of common ground in that idea. What fun!

    Liked by 4 people

    1. anne leueen says:

      I agree 100%. The horse is our common ground.

      Liked by 2 people

  9. Have a wonderful day my friend 😊❤️

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Thank you Susie 🙂

      Like

  10. beautiful. I have a post coming up, next week, featuring a horse we met in Ireland.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      I look forward to meeting that Irish horse.

      Like

  11. Lesley says:

    I love watching your videos. It’s like poetry in motion!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Thank you. That is a wonderful compliment.

      Like

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