Easier said than done!

Well done is better than well said.

Benjamin Franklin

I heard this quote from Benjamin Franklin the other day and it struck a chord within for me . In equestrian sport it is so much easier to talk about how to do something well, than to actually do it well. Sitting in the tack room lots of us can say what should be done when you are riding a jump course or a dressage test. But the theory of how to do it is one thing ,it is another thing altogether to actually get out there and do it.

This past week I had an excellent lesson on Tuesday. No video was taken so you will just have to take my word for it. Usually I have lessons on Thursday and Friday as well but this week my coach Belinda Trussell was teaching a clinic on Thursday. So Biasini and I went for a long trail ride in the forest with Lexi ( Biasini calls her Super Groom Lexi). Lexi was riding the Uber Model, Touch. We went in the direction where the trail crosses a big culvert with a stream running through it. Biasini does not like this gurgling culvert. Touch looked at it and snorted a couple of times and walked on over it. Biasini did not even blink and followed him.

On Friday, we had our lesson with Belinda. Biasini told me, in the warm up, that he would rather go for another trail ride. But that was not on the agenda! So I had to get him going and fire up his enthusiasm! He responded in a begrudging sort of way. Belinda told me I had to ride on! It took quite a few exercises to get him into the right mindset but eventually he was there. She also gave me some tips on how to know how he was going. One that worked well for me was to see how easy it was to bend him in the corners. Was he even and light on both reins? Was he wanting to fall in toward my inside leg? Did he slow down and loose impulsion when I asked for the bend?

Here is a video from the end of the lesson. There had been a lot of hard work that went into this lesson. But in the end it was “well done.”

21 Comments Add yours

  1. Good old Ben had a real way with words. The video proves it, namely….well done!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Yes Ben had simple and easy to understand words of wisdom.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. David says:

    “Sitting in the tack room lots of us can say what should be done when you are riding a jump course or a dressage test.”

    I had written about this when my daughters were making the transition from the junior ranks into the senior ranks. One show was a disaster for them. They finished near last in every event they entered. Elizabeth wanted to come home (we were in SoCal). I told them chat with Mark and Trish before making any decision. Trish told them they were not quitting; practice a little, correct what needs correcting, and get back out there. They had to endure a few whispers from those who knew them, who did not know them, both groups saying, “Perhaps they’re not that good. They probably got lucky when they were juniors.” The following week, Tara edged out a seasoned professional in the jump-off to win the GP, Deborah finished sixth, and Elizabeth 14th. Fast forward to the following year, Elizabeth was a completely different rider. The lesson – trust Lilith a little more, she won’t let you down.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Well you have been there and seen it. I remember the Juniors and Young Riders as well. I think many sports have the same challenges when moving up.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Well done, Anne! And well said too. I love the way you break it down.

    Like

    1. anne leueen says:

      Thank you Gbolabo for taking the time to read and comment. I know many followers are not horse riders so I try to explain what is going on.

      Like

  4. Considering that he wanted to go for another trail ride, he did more than “well done” πŸ˜‰ 🐎

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      haha! Yes I guess he did.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. kinge says:

    Interesting how you have to understand he’s language to better communicate and be a team. Yes, it’s easier said than done because the mechanics of doing are different. Nice

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      thanks for this comment. It is tricky to understand a horse as they do not speak as we do but by observing little signs we can pick up what they are telling us.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. dprastka says:

    Oh that stinker wanting another trail ride! I agree, easier said than done, lovely finish to your lesson. He has such a beautiful way of moving! 🐴❀️

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      He is a very talented horse and he can move beautifully when I am able to get him together. Thanks for understanding he can also be a stinker!🀣

      Liked by 1 person

  7. O.D. says:

    Lol you put it nicely! Theories are all well and nice, in fact, they are easy to come up with. Its putting it all into practice thats the real challenge.

    And yes, a β€œwell done” is certainly better than staying glued to the drawing board!

    Lessons to live by. Thanks for this Anne πŸ’š

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      You are most welcome. Working with a horse is always a learning experience and many of the lessons learned can translate to all parts of life.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Emma Cownie says:

    I like the way Biasini told you “that he would rather go for another trail ride”. Animals communicate so clearly at times!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Yes they do and sometimes it is not quite what we want to hear! πŸ˜„

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Excellent. We have true grit.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. sandyjwhite says:

    And in life as well, it is one thing to talk a good line and completely another to actually
    accomplish something !

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Absolutely! Thanks for this comment Sandy.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. sandyjwhite says:

        I’m glad you and Biasini are having success in
        getting things done!

        Liked by 1 person

I'd love to hear from you!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.