Do It Anyways!

This week my coach Belinda Trussell has been getting me to make up my own mind about what needs to be done every moment of my riding. Does Biasini need a half halt? A correction? Belinda is resisting telling me what to do and watching to see what my decisions are.

So I have to make the decisions and react to what Biasini is offering me. I may make the wrong decision or not commit to my decision. Then Belinda will let me know. Is this criticism? In a way it is but it is also valuable assistance. I can’t hold back . I must go for it. I must not be fearful of doing the wrong thing. I have to ‘do it anyways.

Sometimes I make the wrong choice or I am too late making a choice about what action to take. But sometimes the choice to take action comes almost spontaneously. I do not even think about it. Here is a video where I turn a corner and give Biasini a half halt to re-balance. It happens just after the 24 second mark. Belinda has something to say about it. If you watch the video you will find out what she thought of my action.

At the end of this video Belinda asks me: “What was your feel?” Feel is important in riding. I have to feel when Biasini is in good balance, or when he needs a reminder. My feel for this half pass was good. He felt light in my hands and reacted well to my leg aids. What a joy it is to have a ride like this.

And just in case you think it is always going along swimmingly I should tell you that today, when we were working on our own, Biasini was frightened by his own shadow on the wall . The sun was coming in from the big windows at the west end of the arena and when we would come round the corner he would startle and stop with his head in giraffe position. It took us a few times around to get him over that. Horses always keep things interesting don’t they?

Biasini , trot half pass, in Florida last winter.

Feature image of Biasini’s legs in half pass (C) Connie Gee.

17 Comments Add yours

  1. MAP195 says:

    good post…thanks for share

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Alli Farkas says:

    I’ve been with my trainer so long that after years of repetition I know (almost) instantly and instinctively what to do to catch my horse’s little evasions and get her back on track. My timing is improving, but still not quite quick enough. However, the best part is that my trainer does not micro-manage and does let me figure out many things for myself. Only if she sees that something really needs an explanation will we take a talk break and discuss it. A lesson can go on for several minutes until she tells me, “Did you notice how I haven’t said anything about (x, y or z)?” Then she makes a wisecrack about losing her job security…I don’t think at this point I could be happy with a trainer who constantly barks out orders for every tiny adjustment. And we all know riding is a skajillion tiny adjustments, right?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Indeed it is! Thanks for this comment Alli!

      Like

  3. Keeping things interesting…indeed. It is a brilliant way to deal with what otherwise could be frustrating.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. anne leueen says:

      I think it is a good way to look at it . Thanks for commenting!

      Like

  4. dprastka says:

    Such a great quote “Do It Anyways” because that’s how we all learn. And it’s wonderful that much of your reactions to the feeling of the two of you together is coming easier each day you ride. If it can be a natural reaction to fix his stride the better and quicker you’ll become. Wonderful half pass video and photo! ♥️

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      thanks Diana! I really appreciate your positive feedback. I’m sure you remember from your hunter/jumper days it looks easy but is anything but!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. dprastka says:

        Yes, most DEFINITELY! We need to make it look like we are just sitting up there not doing anything gliding along with all these beautiful movements. Whether it’s the approach and take off over a fence? Or half pass through the arena. Nothing about it is easy, and it’s a good workout!! 🥰

        Liked by 1 person

        1. anne leueen says:

          In the hunters especially they must look so calm and easy going in the perfect arc over the fence. At least the Grand Prix jumpers can look like they are riding like mad!

          Liked by 1 person

          1. dprastka says:

            Haha! That’s true! They are CRAZY those Grand Prix riders and VERY brave! 😉

            Liked by 1 person

          2. anne leueen says:

            But I give the highest “crazy” award to the Eventers. I honestly believe they have a diminished sense of danger. I used to do it as a teenager and I never considered how dangerous the cross country course was.

            Like

          3. dprastka says:

            Well, now that I think about it I’d have to agree with you as I’ve never officially evented in a show, but I’ve jumped the jumps at a couple facilities. It was scary, and it was only a few jumps. I think you described it best that they have a diminished sense of danger. Like the daredevils that rock climb and even sky dive. Of course, I’m deathly afraid of heights so those things seem crazy too! Lol 😀

            Like

  5. It is so wonderful to see you and Biasini together. I think the two of you are such a great match!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. anne leueen says:

      Thank you! Biasini is certainly the most talented horse I have ever had and he has taught me so much. He is also a quirky fellow so that keeps me entertained.

      Liked by 4 people

      1. I am so happy that you have him in your life. A good horse is worth his weight in gold.

        Liked by 1 person

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