I’m a Fan of Birdwatching!

A Chipping Sparrow. They spend the winter in the south: California, Tennessee and Maryland southward. This one may be travelling north for the breeding season. This little bird likes to line the nest with hair and formerly used horse hair but with the decline in the use of horses they will use any other hair even taking hairs from a sleeping dog. Biasini has donated some of the hair he has shed out. I hope they will find it useful.
This little sparrow is a song sparrow. They are found all over North America. Their song is a varied trill sometimes interpreted as ” Madge-Madge-Madge-put-on-your-tea-kettle-ettle-ettle.”

This is my response to Jez’ I’m a Fan of … photo challenge. Information on the sparrows came from The Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Birds. I have been recording all the birds I have seen at the feeders, each Saturday and Sunday, since December for the Birds Canada Winter Feederwatch project. Sadly it has now come to an end but I still enjoy seeing all the bird visitors.

27 Comments Add yours

  1. workinacresnothours says:

    Such precious tiny little amazing birds. Their colours & patterns are so pretty, great photos.

    Like

    1. anne leueen says:

      So glad you enjoyed the little birds. For some reason your comment had gone to Spam. I am glad I rescued it!

      Like

  2. Laleh Chini says:

    I adore them.❤️

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Yay, birds, Anne! In our new place, we have feeders ready and waiting. I guess they are a little shy! Thanks for sharing!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      I think they will come! 😀

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Irene says:

    Great images. Must have been fun recording so many birds. 😊

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Yes it was. I missed doing it this weekend. But the Feederwatch only goes over the winter. I am going to try to get some action photos and ill have to up my shutter speed.😄

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Irene says:

        That should be a bit of a challenge. 😊

        Liked by 1 person

        1. anne leueen says:

          Indeed. I am used to capturing horses moving but those wings are waaaaay faster.

          Liked by 1 person

  5. VJ Knutson says:

    I am loving the goldfinches – so bright and cheery.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      They are and they are so active and busy.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. dprastka says:

    So BEAUTIFUL!! Love your bird watching and educational too! Thanks for sharing! ❤️

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      My pleasure Diana. I have learned a lot this winter with the Feederwatch program

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Anne Sandler says:

    Nice photos Anne. I’m not a bird watcher (I don’t have the patience!), but I do enjoy photographing them when I can. I’d probably get better at it if I waited for them to fly into a zone focus!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. anne leueen says:

      We have feeders right outside our kitchen windows. I have two cameras on my desk and when I see a bird I want to take a photo of I grab the one with the long lens and try to snap it before it flies away. It is made easier by having the feeders there as they tend to stay longer at them .

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Love these rare and beautiful birds, sure they will make the day beautiful.

    Like

    1. anne leueen says:

      It is always entertaining to watch them and the goldfinches are such a bright color now. Thank you for this comment Subbashini.

      Like

  9. Wow…these images are brilliant!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Thank you ! I’m glad you liked them.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Laura says:

    Isn’t birding a great way to watch our beautiful feathered friends? The nearby wetlands also has guest birds from other areas, this past fall a white pelican showed up for a couple of days.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      That would be wonderful to have seen that. Wetlands do attract lots of interesting birds.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Emma Cownie says:

    I love these North American birds, sort of like the their European cousins but also very different.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Yes it is interesting. I have had some exchanges with a blogger in India who photographs birds and he has looked up the genetic ancestry of some of my birds that look similar to some he sees but they have no common history.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Emma Cownie says:

        That’s interesting but it makes sense. I assumed that the north American birds were called robins and blackbirds because they reminded Europeans of the birds back home, I’d be very surprised if they had a connection with Europe…although I know some birds can fly mind boggling distances.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. anne leueen says:

          This is true. Our robins are much bigger than the English ones. Ours are a thrush sized bird the only similarity is that they have a reddish colored breast. The English robin is a dear little bird.

          Liked by 1 person

  12. KShai1715 says:

    I call myself an “accidental” birder.

    I love photography and hiking. It seemed only prudent that I actually bring my camera with me while hiking.

    For nearly the last 7 years, I have actively gone birding every time I can, and I photographed 120 species now.

    I love finding new ones, and have a big photo day I still need to put up on my blog as well.

    Liked by 1 person

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