Why do I need mini-lessons?

Last week Belinda Trussell rode Biasini and when she had finished her work with him I got on to just spend a bit of time in the saddle and walk Biasini. So up I get and I asked him to trot so I could practice some posting trot . Then I heard Belinda’s voice: “You are sitting to the left.” And then: “try to not let your legs come forward”. Ah Yes! I was back. Belinda then asked if I minded some corrections or would I rather just ride. I immediately replied that I wanted the corrections.

Then Belinda had me do a simple exercise: leg yield head to the wall. In this exercise the rider asks the horse to leg yield along the wall and then perhaps make a turn on the forehand and go back leg yielding in the other direction. As I did this Belinda would ask for more angle or less angle. I was back using muscles I had forgotten I had.

At the end Belinda said in reference to feeling compelled to teach: “This is the problem when you have an ambitious coach.” I laughed. She is talking about being ambitious for me not for herself.

Now I have arranged with Belinda to do some “mini lessons”. Lots of work can be done at the walk: shoulder in, haunches in, leg yielding, half passes. Why is this important? I have been away from riding for two months. If I start back and I am not in the correct position or applying the aids correctly, in no time at all, I could be setting the wrong habits. So why not have Belinda giving me corrections so I can come back establishing the right habits. I am lucky to have a coach who will give mini lessons at the walk. Belinda will get on and start Biasini with a warm up and then I will get on and we will start our “lesson” for about 20 minutes or half a hour. All of the exercises will be done at the walk. I think I could do sitting trot or canter without pain or aggravation to the injured hip but what I cannot do is use my body well enough to get Biasini into the right frame. A frame like this.

Every moment on the horse is a training moment .Biasini has had two months of being ridden by excellent professionals who give him the precisely correct aids. I might only confuse him and undo their good riding work. But at the walk I can focus on my aids and with Belinda’s instruction know when I need more or need less.

Once I am stronger I will move up to the trot and canter. But for now the walk will serve me well . And it is worth remembering this:

Small opportunities are often the start of great enterprises.

Demosthenes

12 Comments Add yours

  1. bushboy says:

    I saw a sign yesterday
    Aim for progress not perfection.
    Perhaps could be applied 🤔😀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Yes it could for sure. That is one of my favorite slogans for life. Thanks !

      Liked by 1 person

  2. David says:

    Good to see you back in lessons.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Well I am a ways away from full on lessons but this is a start. Thanks David!

      Like

  3. J.W.S. says:

    This is such a fine lesson for us all.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      I guess it is. Thanks J.W.S.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Kevin says:

    Glad to see you back in the saddle. 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Thank you. I am happy to be back.😀

      Like

  5. Neal Saye says:

    If only we were all so open to correction and instruction.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      I am lucky to have a coach who will put in the time and energy to give me those corrections . But I know what you mean Neal!😀

      Liked by 1 person

  6. There IS a lot we can do for ourselves and our horses at the walk. As you so well explain, walking doesn’t have to be boring or without benefit, even for advanced riders like you. So happy for you that you are back in the saddle!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Thank you for this comment. I’m glad you also see.the value of work at the walk.

      Liked by 1 person

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