Magic in the Old. Magic in the New.

This week the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge is “Old and New from Amy at The World is a Book. Click on the theme to see her photos that inspire us to this challenge. I am able to respond with photos of horses. This wooden horse in the Tower of London is wearing a muzzle that was in use between 1552 and 1621. Its purpose is unknown. Perhaps for protection in battle or to stop the horse from grazing while waiting for the battle to begin.

Armourers (7 of 10)

Contrary to the belief that the horses who wore armor were large beasts they were actually not big by today’s standards and would have been around 15 hands. So they were smaller than my horse Biasini who is an inch over 16 hands. Here is the armor of Henry VIII . His silvered armor was decorated with pomegranite and Tudor roses.

tower (4 of 14)
tower (7 of 14)

Here is a photo of a complete set of armour made in Germany in 1480. It is one of only three complete sets of armour made before the 16th Century. It is on display at Wallace Collection in London.

Wallace (41 of 50)

Now for something completely different and new from 2018. Only the color of the horse is the same.

Wallace (29 of 50)

No need for armour now and less severe bits are used.

There is magic in the old and magic in the new; the trick is to successfully combine the two.”
― A.D. Posey

And here is the old and new succesfully combined.This photo is from the Changing of the Guard at the Horse Guards in London England.

4-IMG_6617

Thank you Amy for this challenge!

25 Comments Add yours

  1. pattimoed says:

    Wonderful post, Anne. Beautiful images and great info, too.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Thanks Patti. I’m glad you found something of interest in the post. Have a good weekend.

      Like

  2. Leya says:

    Interesting facts and great photos, Anne! Thank you for all historic news. I say, the soldiers must have really cared for their horse companions. But luckily the days of heavy armor is gone. It was beautifully crafted though – real artwork. And it is good to know the armor for the horses were not heavier than the soldier’s. “There is magic in the old and magic in the new; the trick is to successfully combine the two.”
    ― A.D. Posey

    Liked by 2 people

    1. anne leueen says:

      Thank you for this comment. I’m glad you found the post interesting.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Tina Schell says:

    Loved this one Anne, perfect for the theme. I was amazed at the intricacy of the armor. Can you imagine how heavy this must have been for the poor horses, not only their own armor but that of their riders as well?! Terrific post.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. anne leueen says:

      Two years ago we did an organized tour of Arms and Armouries . Our guide was the arms person from the Tower. We learned all about the horse armour and the knights armour. The knights was heavier than the horses! And for both it was much lighter than it looked. Since the horses were small and they needed to be fast for jousting or battles they could not be weighed down. Thanks for commenting Tina.

      Like

  4. JohnRH says:

    Fascinating study. Well done.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Horses in any age of history are incredible beings, regal and strong, just like Biasini is now in the 21st century! Thanks for showing us the history of horses and their armor, Anne!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. anne leueen says:

      I’m happy to know you found it interesting Terri. Thanks for your comment.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Good to know pride history of horses. They always tells valuable lessons

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Meikah says:

    Great trivia! I always find horses regal, don’t you think?

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Lovely post….thank you

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      You’re welcome. Glad you enjoyed.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. In reference to the first photo- Wow! Now THAT is an ornate grazing muzzle. I want to order one for my horses. 🙂 Puts their rubber grazing muzzles to shame!
    Loved looking at the elaborate armour. I’ve gotten to ride a Friesian a couple of times and had the image in my mind of riding into battle. I bet riding with all that armour was an experience unto itself. I’ll have to add in the imagery of the armour if I ever get to ride one again!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. anne leueen says:

      Yes the armour is very ornate. There were specialist unions and the members made the armour. The Armourers and Brasiers still exists but they don’t make armour now. The armour was not as heavy as it looks and the most interesting thing to me was how small all the horses were. They had to be smaller and quick for the battles and also for the jousting tournaments. I have ridden a Freisian a few years ago and it was a lot of fun. So ride on into battle if you ride one again!

      Like

  10. Beautiful photos Anne! I think was not easy for that poor horses with that armour 🐴😢

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      No I dont think it was but interestingly enough the horse armour weighed less than the knights armour. Also.they had padding and lining on the inside to make it more comfortable for the horse. Apparently knights valued their horses very highly.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. At least something good 😉

        Liked by 1 person

  11. I would much rather be YOUR horse than a SOLDIER horse. Integrating info as always.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      I would agree!😃

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Amy says:

    A remarkable post for this theme, Anne! Beautiful photos of the magic in the old and in the new. Love the last one especially, “No need for armour now and less severe bits are used.”! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

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