Churchill was not the only famous Winston.

I recently got an interesting comment from Susan who had read my blog post “The Day I met a Cavalry Black”. In this post I had called the horse Winston. I had just made this up to be honest, as I felt he was such a nice fellow I should give him a name. But Susan told me the Queen had ridden a horse called Winston. He was a Chestnut gelding and King George VI had ridden him in the Trooping of the Color in 1947 and the Queen rode him in the Trooping from 1949 to 1956.

image Guards Magazine

Here is what Wikipedia has to say about Winston.

Winston, whose sire was Erehwemos, was foaled in Yorkshire in 1937. In 1944 he was sold to the Mounted Branch of the Metropolitan Police Service.[1] Although named after Winston Churchill, the letter “W” was used to name all police horses in 1944.[2] As a police horse, Winston often was present on duty at public events such as the Changing of the Guard before he was selected for Royal duties.

In 1947, Winston carried King George VI during the first Trooping of the Colour to take place since 1939. Winston participated in various roles in other Royal ceremonial events when not working as a police horse. From 1949 to 1951, then Princess Elizabeth took her father’s place at the ceremony, becoming the first British Queen since Elizabeth I to review her troops on horseback.[3] Though other police horse were made available, the Queen always preferred Winston.[4] The year of 1951 led to the future Queen first wearing her red Guards uniform; prior to this she wore a blue uniform.[5]

During the Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II procession, Winston was ridden by Sir John Nott-Bower, the Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis.

Winston retired from Troopings and other Royal Duties in 1956. Whilst later being ridden by a mounted police officer at the Police mounted training establishment at Thames Ditton, Winston slipped and dislocated his back on 7 February 1957, requiring him to be euthanized.[2]

Image Pinterest

Here is a photo of me with the Cavalry Black, on guard at the Horse Guards in London, that I gave the name “Winston”

He was a very kind fellow so I thought he deserved a name and Winston just came to mind.

Perhaps Winston knew I was a horse person and thought I might have a small treat in my bag.

I am grateful to Susan for letting me know the Queen had a favorite horse called Winston. He looks like he was a nice fellow and I like knowing that the Queen had a favorite horse to ride in the Trooping. She must have trusted him and he would have trusted her too

26 Comments Add yours

  1. firnhyde says:

    Lovely story and stunning photos!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Thank you. Glad you liked the post.

      Like

  2. Emma Cownie says:

    I liked your “Winston” and he looked like he liked you too. That must be very hard for a horse to stand completely still like that!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      I think it would be for a horse not trained to it. But the Guards horses get exercised in Hyde Park in the morning and then they trot up from thr Knightsbridge Barracks to the Horse Guards so he will have had a chance to get a bit of movement. Also they take turns standing in the guard boxes and then get breaks in stalls inside the Horse Guards.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Emma Cownie says:

        Well, if they have had a chance to stretch their legs earlier on, it’s probably quite natural, after all horses stand around in fields a lot.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Awesome, love the information on the real Winston.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      I was very glad that the person whobleft the comment about him.did so because inhad not heard about him before.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Always something new to learn.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. anne leueen says:

          Makes life interesting!

          Like

  4. Love the story of Winston, the photos of you with the Winston you named are just beautiful.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Thank you. My Winston was such a nice fellow. I love how the Guard has to keep such a straight face forward. I think he knew i was not doing anything to upset the horse.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. That’s a wonderful photo of the guardsman’s horse having a quick peek, or nose around, your handbag!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Yes it is. And also the Guard sitting on him is still looking straight ahead. I guess he knew I was a horse person and it was going to be ok.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. dprastka says:

    I really enjoyed reading about Winston! Thank you for sharing this bit of history and how you came about looking into one of the Queen’s favorite horses. He was so handsome! ❤️

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Thank you Diana. He was handsome!

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Lesley says:

    Such interesting information, Anne. Your Winston looks gorgeous. I love black horses! It does look like he was expecting a treat from you. 😀

    Like

    1. anne leueen says:

      Well I think he thought there might be a good chance I had something for him. But he was very polite about it.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Sarah Davis says:

    Enjoyed this, thanks.

    My new boy looks similar to old Winston.

    Like

    1. anne leueen says:

      Glad you enjoyed it. Your new fellow is a handsome one like the old Winston!

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Judy says:

    It wasn’t until the second picture that I realized she’s riding sidesaddle. Gorgeous animals.

    Like

    1. anne leueen says:

      I suppose that since it was in the 1950s it would have been considered inappropriate for the Queen to ride astride a horse!

      Liked by 1 person

  10. As always informative and enjoyable read

    Like

    1. anne leueen says:

      Thank you Subbashini

      Like

  11. J.W.S. says:

    Wonderful history! Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      You are most welcome!

      Liked by 1 person

I'd love to hear from you!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.