The Gift of Time.

Then, in a small town in Italy, the first mechanical clock was built. People were spellbound. Later they were horrified. Here was a human invention that quantified the passage of time, that laid ruler and compass to the span of desire, that measured out exactly the moments of a life. It was magical, it was unbearable, it was outside natural law. Yet the clock could not be ignored. It would have to be worshipped.   —-Alan Lightman. 

Time. It is a valuable commodity. It is an endangered species.  Who has enough time? I often hear people complain of not having enough time. Not enough time to relax and enjoy life. Not enough time to spend with their children, with their partners, with their parents. Not enough time. How does this lack of time affect riders and their horses?

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The Young Riders

Carl Hester has spoken about what he sees as a disturbing trend with the younger riders. Their parents deliver them to their riding lessons just in time to get on and ride. They do not tack up or untack their horses or ponies. Right after the lesson they speed off to their dance class or their violin lesson.  Carl Hester feels these young people can never be true horsemen or horsewomen.  I know there are still young riders who love to hang out at the barn and spend time around horses. I believe that this is time well spent and not time wasted. If the young person is not happy with ‘hanging out’ at the barn they will never be a true horse person. So it would be best if their parents stopped taking them to riding lessons and found a sport or an interest that the young person really loves. BTW…I am not suggesting that the two young riders in the photo are not keen riders who  love to spend  time with their ponies.

The Adult Amateurs

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I have always had a passion for horses. But there as a 30 year period in my life when I did not ride. I was pursuing a career, and then raising young children  while still working. There was no time for riding. Many adult amateurs have careers that demand time and energy.They get to the barn late and perhaps are  tired and stressed. They feel guilty about not having more time to spend with their horses. If they have a family there is an even greater squeeze on their time.

 

The Professionals   

The Professionals have horses to ride; horses in training, sponsored competition horses, horses they own themselves. It takes up hours of the day to ride and train several horses. Then the professionals also teach. Lessons have to fit in around the riding schedule.  If they have families where does the family fit in? How do they carve out time for a family, a relationship, a life?

Oh, I know there are courses on time management, day timers and planners and self help books and online planners that will help you to “manage your time.” But  let’s face it “finding time” is a lost art.

My Grandmother had two children and ran a business in the 1920s and 1930s. She had a children’s clothing shop.She designed the clothes and had cutters and sewers to make the clothes. She would go to the East End of London and buy fabric, ribbons and decorations for her designs. I have been told she loved to go to the East End and sit with the fabric merchants. Why? Because after choosing her fabrics they would sit down with her and have a cup of tea and chat. They took the time to do that. She  took the time to stop and have tea and enjoy the time.

Leaving aside the daytimers and the planners and the advice we get about time management we just have to be ready to stop.  Just stop. And forgive ourselves for stopping. Forgive ourselves for not getting it all done. Take the time.

The clock does not have to be worshipped.

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20 Comments Add yours

  1. Irene says:

    I couldn’t agree with you more! My husband and I were just talking this weekend about how it seems that everyone is way too busy to even spend time with friends, build relationships, or just enjoy some free time by taking a walk. 😔

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      It’s true isn’t it. I think my Grandmother had a lot of time pressure with her business and family but she still took time for tea with the fabric merchants. Today it seems that the pressure has built to a point where people feel that cannot take that time out. Thanks for your comment Irene. It’s good to know that others are seeing the same thing.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Amazing post, your words makes to realize how precious spending time for ourselves. Our life is made up of time.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Thank you Subbashini. I appreciate you taking the time to let me know how you felt about the post. Time is precious isn’t it.

      Like

  3. dprastka says:

    Lovely post, aren’t we all chasing the clock! I have never been one for day planners and was not the soccer mom, going from one lesson or event to another but new many mom’s like this and it’s crazy. I agree with Carl as I worked for a horse trainer in my youth and saw those kids being dropped off get a lesson, picked up, off to dance etc. So thankful I grew up differently.

    Even though I still work full time, I’m trying to enjoy each day as I wish there was more time! It does amaze me how much we can enjoy squeezing in family and my beloved horses!! ❤️ -Diana

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      I love your attitude Diana! Thanks for this comment

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Emma Cownie says:

    I’ve been thinking about this and decided that these days it’s not clock time I am governed by but daylight.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. anne leueen says:

      Ah! This is very interesting. Biasini is also governed by daylight . He starts to shed his summer coat as soon as the days get shorter and his winter fur starts to grow in. I will have to think about the concept of daylight as a guide for my time. I am a bit of a night owl so it could be tricky.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Emma Cownie says:

        That explains why my cats have started growing thicker coats too!

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Emma Cownie says:

    Too true. When I was a teacher, I was so pressed for time, if I saw a friend/colleague in work I would mentally calculate how long I could afford to chat with them before I started talking to them, if I stopped at all. That’s no way to live!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Kindof like Carpe Diem (Seize the Day) only for time – Take the time!

    And I understand the concern about overscheduled kids – had similar situations with some of my music students – lesson first, then off to soccer game, etc.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. anne leueen says:

      Yes it is a Carpe Diem . And interesting to know that the overfilled schedules happened for music students as well . It wasn’t something I believed in for my kids and they seem to have grown up into reasonable adults. My daughter has a 4 year old sons and two step daughters 8 and 10 and they are not over scheduled either. Thanks for taking the time to comment Laura.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. sandyjwhite says:

    Yes, enjoy time more with less “doing” and more “being”!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      You have put it very well!

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Good advice…very “timely.”

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Indeed! I appreciate your sense of humor.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Jeff Rab says:

    Very interesting! Not only with the way people train and work with their horses, people live day in and day out at top speed while the clock steadily ticks away. At the end of the day, did we do the best we could with our time… I don’t know.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      I also think the idea that time is a gift reminds me to enjoy the time I have here in this life.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Jeff Rab says:

        Yes! Anne, it is so possible to get wrapped up in today that we forget to enjoy it! It seems like an ongoing balancing act.

        Like

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