The Monday Minstrel: Sand Pounders.

During WWII, the US Coast Guard Beach Patrol covered more than 3,700 mile of coast and employed about 24,000 men. Patrols on horseback worked in pairs, riding about 100 feet apart, usually covering a 2-mile stretch. They were called “Sand Pounders” and were able to cover difficult terrain quickly and efficiently. c 1945.

horseandman.com

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16 responses to “The Monday Minstrel: Sand Pounders.”

  1. Tina Schell Avatar

    That is so interesting Anne. I’m surprised it’s so little known. I wonder how you learned about it?? Loved the image too.

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    1. anne leueen Avatar

      I originally saw it on the Florida coast near Palm City and was reminded of it yesterday by a Facebook post. Glad you found it interesting.

      Like

  2. David Avatar

    A bit of history I do know about …

    The US Army was making the transition from horse cavalry to armored cavalry and had lots of horses and mules in their inventory. Shortly after the American entry into WWII, the question arose how do we defend the coastline. We knew German submarines were patrolling off the eastern seaboard, attacking maritime shipping from the US to Europe and Russia. Suppose the Germans were to land raiding parties, how would we cope with them? USCG came up with the idea of beach patrols. They would use the horses and mules being furloughed from military service. A lot of the vet techs and cavalrymen who worked with military horses transferred from the Army into the USCG. Those military horses who were released didn’t fare well with civilian owners; they were ill-equipped and ill-suited for horse ownership, which is eerily familiar with those wanting to adopt wild horses.

    The horse stock was still relatively young, most were younger than 7 years old and hadn’t entered their prime years as working horses. Over more difficult terrain, mules were more suitable as they are more sure-footed than the ablest of pack horses. And, if the USCG needed to move equipment along the shore, and they did, mules were more able. After the war finished, many of the horses and mules were transferred back to the Army to live out their lives.

    Mark, Trish’s husband, he knows a lot about the history of military horses. When he enlisted in the Army, they sent him to school on how be horse vet tech; he’d be working with horses used in military honor guards.

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    1. anne leueen Avatar

      Thank you for this info I am going to put up another post about the sand pounders. Would it ok with you if i quoted what you have written here? I would add it to the info I have from Wikipedia that has lots of numbers of horses etc.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. David Avatar

        Yes, you may.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Lillian-Keith Avatar

    Wow, that’s so cool! I never knew that.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen Avatar

      It is interesting isn’t it. They had them on the south east coast and also in the west in Oregon .

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Lillian-Keith Avatar

        Cool! When I have some time later on, I’ll have to learn more 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        1. anne leueen Avatar

          I think I’ll put up another post with more info. Maybe next Monday

          Liked by 1 person

  4. sandyjwhite Avatar

    This is a new one to me, Anne. Very interesting.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen Avatar

      Thanks for this comment..I’m glad you found this post interesting

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Roadtirement Avatar

    Most interesting, did not know about that slice of history.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen Avatar

      They had one group on the south east coast and another on the coast of Oregon.

      Like

  6. Neal Saye Avatar

    How interesting! Sand Pounders—I’ve never heard of them.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen Avatar

      I think they were south of Hilton Heas ans southwards. I know I had seen things about them on the coast near Palm City FL.

      Liked by 1 person

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