Monday Minstrel: Daylight Saving?

Courtesy of timeanddate.com I can give you some of the history of Daylight saving Time. It was invented in Canada in 1908.

Daylight Saving Time is the practice of setting the clocks one hour ahead of standard time to make use of more sunlight in the spring, summer, and fall evenings. While Germany and Austria were the first countries to use DST in 1916, it is a little-known fact that a few hundred Canadians beat the German Empire by eight years. On July 1, 1908, the residents of Port Arthur, Ontario—today’s Thunder Bay—turned their clocks forward by one hour to start the world’s first DST period. Other locations in Canada soon followed suit. On April 23, 1914, Regina in Saskatchewan implemented DST. The cities of Winnipeg and Brandon in Manitoba did so on April 24, 1916. According to the April 3, 1916, edition of the Manitoba Free Press, Daylight Saving Time in Regina “proved so popular that bylaw now brings it into effect automatically.” However, the idea did not catch on globally until Germany introduced DST in 1916. Clocks in the German Empire, and its ally Austria, were turned ahead by one hour on April 30, 1916—two years into World War I. The rationale was to minimize the use of artificial lighting to save fuel for the war effort. Within a few weeks, the United KingdomFrance, and many other countries followed the idea. Most of them reverted to standard time after World War I, and it wasn’t until the next World War that DST made its return in most of Europe.

timeanddate.com

So there you have it. At 2am, on March 13, 2022, DST arrived in North America. What did this mean? For most of us it meant an hour’s sleep lost. But what about this fellow? Did he know the clocks had gone forward? Did he care? Nope he just wanted to settle near the canal and keep an eye out for any fish to eat. .

And what about this bird? He also was only interested in watching the water for something to eat .

These youngsters , in the photo below, were just at the water for a quick drink. None of them knew it was an hour ahead for all of us nor did they care!

But I knew! When I got up I had looked out the bedroom window and saw the sun was ready to greet us. In standard time it would have been 6:35. Now thanks to that “spring forward” it was 7:35.

I visited Biasini later in the day and asked the barn workers if they had given the horses their breakfast hay and feed an hour early. Yes, the had. Had any of the horses been surprised to see them early? No, they were just happy to have their food. They didn’t care about any Saving Time Daylight or otherwise!

I think I should learn to live like birds and horses. They know what things are the really important things.

Happy Monday Everyone!

24 Comments Add yours

  1. I wish they would stick to one time and leave it be.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Maria says:

    We do indeed have a lot to learn from animals living in the moment!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Thanks for our comment Maria. I agree.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I agree! We should all learn to live like birds and horses! We have so much to learn from them!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Thank you Ribana. I agree!

      Like

  4. Emma Cownie says:

    Interesting that daylight saying has already started in Canada – we have to wait a couple more weeks here in Ireland.

    Like

    1. anne leueen says:

      To be honest I would have been happy to wait two more weeks! I hate getting up in the dark. The appeal of longer evenings is ok but does not make up for those dark mornings.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Emma Cownie says:

        It’s been so dark here in the morning here for so long, I have got used to it. I just fiddle about on the PC or do yoga exercise until it get light. However, it does mean I am not very good at getting up quickly!

        Liked by 1 person

        1. anne leueen says:

          Haha! I remember living in England and the winter days were pretty short.

          Like

  5. de Wets Wild says:

    The things we humans do to make us feel in control… Like you I’d like to think that the birds and the horses have a better clue about what’s really important.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      I agree. Thanks for your comment.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Tina Schell says:

    LOL, that’s a very interesting thought Anne! I really dislike the time change but would vote to continue it UNLESS they’d choose DST as the standard as I love the light in the late afternoon/evening during spring and summer.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      I love the evening in summer too. And I don’t like it in winter when it gets dark so soon. I used to live in England and it could be dark by 4pm in December! Thanks for your comment Tina!

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Anne Sandler says:

    Thanks for the information Anne. Now I know who to blame for this crazy time change! Although I prefer standard time, I’d accept daylight savings time if we could stick with one and not change the clocks. I enjoyed all your photos and agree that animals can adjust better than us. But, my dog does tell time when it comes to his walk and dinner!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Horses know feed times too. They start to get restless and my horse starts to bang his stall door as soon as he sees the feed buckets coming out of the feed room. they all have to get water in them so he is a bit too quick wth his banging!

      Liked by 1 person

  8. J.W.S. says:

    The dogs are flexible…though changing clocks is not a favorite activity of mine.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      I feel the same!

      Like

  9. Amy says:

    I love this bird selection, Anne. The first one is my favorite. It talke some adjustment for the daylight saving. Birds and horses are smart. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      I happened to have my 250-600mm lens already mounted on my camera body and when I saw the heron I jsut started to take some photos. I woke up this morning and was not happy to see it was time to get up and it was still DARK outside!

      Like

  10. We appreciate the extra daylight, even though I am an early riser. It takes a day or two to get into sync after the change.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      I agree. Thanks for commenting 🙂

      Like

  11. My state has rejected Daylight Saving at least three times since its inception. The only time I enjoyed it was the second instance in my undergraduate days where we played tennis late into the evening. Anyway, the issue for us has been cows. Like your horses, they have been happy to be fed or milked regardless of any adjustment to the time.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Thanks for your comment. I loathe getting up in the dark so unlike the cows I have difficulty adjusting.

      Like

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