Every Horse Remembered – Lest We Forget.

Every Horse Remembered. Lest We Forget.   My response to Six Word Saturday.

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Ownerless horse on the battlefield. by Adam Albrecht
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The wounded brought by mules to the dressing station by Stanley Spencer September 1916.
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Animals in War memorial Hyde Park, London , England
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The Brooke. Action for working horses and donkeys . Every Horse Remembered. 

15 Comments Add yours

  1. What a beautiful tribute to the horses.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Thank you. I appreciate your comment.

      Like

  2. Emma Cownie says:

    Stanley Spencer’s painting is very poignant. I agree with Cagedun the treatment of the animals was heartbreaking. So was the treatment of the men.

    nant.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      You are so correct on that. Canada could not afford a boat to bring the surviving men back home. So the sent them to Russia! I assume they were eventually brought home. And don’t get me started on a certain President who did not go to pay his respects at the graves of 1600 American soldiers who had died because it was RAINING! The Canadian Prime Minister who went to the Canadian memorial site commented that in that war it was raining BULLETS. I’m going to have a cup of tea and calm down now.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Emma Cownie says:

        I think I reacted in a similar way.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. cagedunn says:

    Reblogged this on Cage Dunn: Writer, Author, Teller-of-tall-tales and commented:
    Lest We Forget – all those who fell, all those left behind …

    Liked by 2 people

    1. anne leueen says:

      Thank you for the reblog!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. cagedunn says:

        It was a beautiful post for our worthy brethren in war … Thank you.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. cagedunn says:

    The horror and shame of all the men who had to leave their horses behind after the war was over; one horse was returned to Australia; their story is a lesson – and if we ever do that again to the creature who worked beside us, saved us, bore us, and bonded with us … let none forget, we were not on that battlefield alone …

    Lest We Forget
    All Those Who Fell, or Were Left Behind

    Sorry, but the way the government treated our horses at the end was a display of arrogance and cold-heartedness. It is a story that shamed the men who shared battles with their horses, their mates, and many never forgave the orders that came down from high … what was done to the ‘Walers is a sad and shameful story.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. anne leueen says:

      Thank you for sharing this sad side of the end of the war. You may know that Dorothy Brooke found thousands of war horses thin and tired being worked ceaselessly on the streets of Cairo. She started a campaign by writing to British newspapers and telling them of the hideous plight of these poor horses who would,as she put it, “never see the green pastures of England again”. She raised enough money to buy most of the horses
      Some could be saved but many had to be put out of their .misery. I am a supporter of the Brooke because they are still working to educate owners and give veterinary treatments to working equines I’m the developing world. What happened to those horses after the war was appalling and many countries politicians and leaders are to blame. Thanks again for your comment and for the reblog.

      Liked by 2 people

  5. What a good take on the prompt and Remembrance Day! We should remember the many dogs, too, including those that serve as service dogs helping with PTSD.

    janet

    Liked by 2 people

    1. anne leueen says:

      Yesterday there was a special service at the Animals in War memorial in London. Dogs were honored and stories told of their bravery and steadfastness . A young girl maybe 8 or 10 read her poem which had won the children’s poetry competition and it was all about dogs. She had the dogs speak for themselves and tell what their job had been in the war. I was in tears listening to her read it.

      Liked by 2 people

  6. anitashope says:

    I will always remember the horse I had growing up. Everyone thought he was not of high quality but his heart was huge and to me that was way more important than his breeding.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. anne leueen says:

      You were right. A great heart is the most important thing.

      Like

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