The Waiting Game

This little hummingbird was waiting to get over to our feeder. There was a male hummingbird there and she knew she would be attacked it she tried to get in for her morning drink.

She had to wait until the male left and then she could get to the feeder. This past week I have not seen any males at the feeder. So the females have had a good time. I wonder if the males have already started to head south as we have had cooler nights. When will the females leave? We leave the feeder out as long as they appear because we think that some of them may be on their journey from farther north and need sustenance.

In the middle of the week we had a calamity with the feeder! It broke and fell to the ground. It was early evening and the hummers always come to get a drink before the night time so I was worried. I quickly made up the mix of sugar and water and my husband went to the Canadian Tire store ( they sell everything not just tires!) to get another feeder. He made it just in time before closing! The new feeder went up and bingo there were the hummers. Whew!

28 Comments Add yours

  1. Roadtirement says:

    We see similar behavior in the hummers in our backyard, only our male stands guard until dark. I assume others sneak in then. By the way, I love the title of your blog. I used to ride , got pitched off my first horse when I was 5. have not mounted for decades.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Good to know you were a rider at one time in your life. I did not ride from age 19-49 ( work, finances and family). I was able to just pick it up as if I had never stopped. So if you ever wanted to try again you could do it.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Emma Cownie says:

    I was just wondering what humming birds did in the Canadian winters and you told me that they don’t, they migrate south!

    Like

    1. anne leueen says:

      Hmmm not sure why I would have said they do not migrate south. They do and they go long distances to Mexico and Central America. They would not do well here in our cold winters.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Emma Cownie says:

        That’s a relief – I was quite amazed that they were in Canada at all but I guess it must get pretty warm in the summer as its a continent.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. anne leueen says:

          We have heat in the 30s in the summer and high humidity so can feel like 40 Celsius.

          Like

  3. Just in time 😉 So cute these little souls 🐦

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Lesley says:

    Thank you for the photo of this beautiful little hummingbird, Anne! We don’t have them here in the u.k., so it’s a real treat for me. I’m so glad you and hubby managed to get the feeding situation sorted very quickly. 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      They are very engaging little birds. They fly off south and go a long way to get a warmer winter. Also they have to feed every 20 minutes and at night they go into a sort of system shut down to conserve energy. Remarkable. Thanks for commenting.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. They look like the sweetest little birds. Gotta love a shop that provides for the humans & the wildlife. It always amazes me how these tiny little birds don’t get blown away in breeze they are so delicate. Beautiful photo

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Yes they are so small but they came through a serious storm last week with winds up to 130 kph. Hail with grape sized hailstones. And torrential rain. But the next day the hummers were back!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Diana says:

    I’m so happy he was able to get a new feeder! What a beautiful photo of the female hummingbird waiting her turn!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Thank you Diana. They are so tiny and precious the hummers.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. sandyjwhite says:

    We have hummers migrating through our area now. If the weather holds, they should continue to pass through all this month. I love watching them! Nice shot, Anne.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Laura says:

    Great photo and story. The hummers here air tangle around the feeder until one flies into a nearby tree, the one getting the prize seat will drink to their heart’s content, when it flies away, the other will take it’s place. I too leave my feeder out for migrating hummers, that is usually until the first week of October, I sure will miss them.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      They are wonderful to watch. Thanks for leaving a comment on your hummers

      Like

  9. Cee Neuner says:

    Beautiful photo 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Thank you Cee. I appreciate that coming from you!😃

      Like

  10. Wow, a noble deed indeed!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      We get very attached to the little birds who come both the hummers and others. During the hot weather we had two birdbaths so they could get a drink and a bath. We also have two feeders with seeds for the birds. It is wonderful to see them.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Absolutely, its such a pleasure to see them feed themselves and water esp during the summers is a blessing..👏👏👏

        Liked by 1 person

  11. Squirrels have destroyed a few of my feeders.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      We have a lot of squirrels but they all focus on the seeds that fall from the bird feeders. Those are up a pole and the pole is wrapped with metal so the squirrels cannot get up to them. Sometimes they try but no success.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. cigarman501 says:

    We have trumpet vine. The hummers love it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Ah! I don’t think I know trumpet vine. We have some red flowers that they try out but the feeder is the favorite.

      Like

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