The Fifth Half Pass

The FEI Grand Prix dressage test has something called the Zig Zag. This is a very difficult movement that calls for five half passes to either side of the centerline with a flying change of leg at each change of direction, the first half pass to the left and the last to the left of 3 strides and the others 6 strides. When the rider gets to the fifth half pass they breathe a sigh of relief.

Half pass left
Half pass right

This is my response to the Sunday Stills Challenge ….Fifth! click on fifth to see other responses.

19 Comments Add yours

  1. Irene says:

    Beautiful captures. Both horses look like they are in deep concentration. ❤️

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      The are busy listening to what the rider asking them to do. The rider is thinking a mile a minute counting the strides and judging the angles and etc etc. I;m glad you liked the photos and thank you for leaving this comment.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Irene says:

        Ah, yes! Working together and toward a great performance. Just realized that this must be much tougher than when the final result is dependent on just one.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Emma Cownie says:

    Who came up with maneuver? It wasn’t a horse, I bet. It looks so difficult for both horse and rider. Its a great credit to both horse and rider, that the horse will do this at all!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      I don’t know who came up with this movement. But the Grand Prix is under the jurisdiction of the FEI so they are the ones who originally devised this. Oddly enough the horses respond quite well to it. I think it is just a huge mental challenge for riders.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Emma Cownie says:

        Wow, I would never have thought that the horses like it better than the riders! Shows how much I know!

        Liked by 1 person

        1. anne leueen says:

          I think the horses do not question things as much as humans do. Most of the work involved for the horse will be within their capability if they are at the Grand Prix. Other movements in the test such as the 15 one tempi changes and the piaffe and passage are more taxing for the horse. But even those things for a horse that has a talent for it they will not over think it and get upset. They just take it one movement at a time. 🐴

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Emma Cownie says:

            and that’s why animals are generally happier than people, they live in the moment (and dont do social media).

            Liked by 1 person

  3. Mark Tulin says:

    I can’t even walk like that.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Neither can I but horses can do it with four feet and legs. That is some co-ordination!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Anne, your images of the horses in dressage action are amazing! I learned something here!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Thank you Terri. The trick in taking photos of the half pass is it must capture the moment when the front leg reaches out in the direction of travel.If you take the shot when it is not leading it looks amazingly awkward. Always interesting to have subjects that are on the move. Thanks for commenting.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. dprastka says:

    So BEAUTIFUL! And looks very difficult. Thanks so much for sharing! ❤️

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      I’m glad you like it Diana. The GP zig zag is extremely difficult but when executed well it looks like the horse and rider are dancing with ease! Thank you for your comment.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. anne leueen says:

      Almost all Grand Prix riders will confess to this being difficult. I am only doing the 3 half pass zig zag for the Inter 1 and i find it hideously difficult 😊😊

      Liked by 1 person

  6. map195 says:

    nice pics thanks for share

    Liked by 1 person

    1. anne leueen says:

      Glad you liked the photos.

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply to Irene Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.